May 20, 2016

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Architecture’s Oddest Couple?

That would be Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson. About whom there’s a new book. According to the Washington Post, “[it’s] a book that is distinguished by clarity, narrative energy and evocative description. Architecture’s Odd Couple . . . is an appealing primer in 20th-century American architecture, with myriad insights into the vanity and interpersonal politics of […]

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October 27, 2013

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HOUSES OF THE PRESIDENTS

  Published in the autumn of 2012, Houses of the Presidents received admiring notices in the  The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. Hugh made the rounds on public radio, while  a slide show of Roger’s pictures went up at the Washington Post, another on the The Daily Beast. USA Today included the book in its listing “Big, beautiful books for […]

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January 12, 2012

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A Bookish Biography

One of Hugh’s first books, The Preservationist’s Progress (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), was a collection of essays and profiles. It was singled out by The New York Times Book Review, which said of it, “The Preservationist’s Progress brings emotion to the literature of historic preservation… . It is an eloquent brief for the integration of […]

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January 4, 2012

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Appearances

I’m assembling a slate of talks — most related to Architecture’s Odd Couple —  following that book’s publication on May 24. The first will be in Manhattan, at the Rizzoli Bookstore, on May 26. On July 30, I’ll be talking at the Frelinghuysen-Morris House and Studio in Lenox; in September, I’ll be the  guest of the Ridgefield, CT, […]

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January 4, 2012

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Reviews

“Intricate and engaging…Howard’s story is…not only about the birth of American painting, but—through the creation of its first, most long-lasting, and most transcendent human icon—about the invention of America itself.”  —The American Scholar “Patron of the arts is not the first association one makes with George Washington, but … Washington, who Howard argues was ‘easier […]

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January 4, 2012

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Miscellaneous Short-Form Writings

My latest piece? A look at the lives of two young women, Berlin-born Gerda and Doris Bloch, who restarted their lives after the Holocaust. Back in July, an  op-ed I wrote for the Washington Post ran in the days after the Confederate flag controversy. You’ll find “The Complex Legacy of Appomattox” in the June 2015 issue of Civil War […]

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January 3, 2012

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Mr. and Mrs. Madison Go to War

From the Bloomsbury Press catalog . . .  August 28, 1814.Dressed in black, James Madison mourns the nation’s loss. Smoke rises from the ruin of the Capitol before him; a mile away stands the blackened shell of the White House. The British have laid waste to Washington City, and as Mr. Madison gazes at the […]

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January 3, 2012

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The Painter’s Chair

“I am so hackneyed to the touches of the painters pencil, that I am now altogether at their beck … no dray moves more readily to the Thill, than I do to the Painters Chair.” –George Washington, May 16, 1785 An eloquent new look at the beginnings of the American republic—through the portraits of its […]

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January 3, 2012

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Houses of the Founding Fathers

The book has just been released in a luxurious paperback edition . . . In this updated edition, the recently relocated home of Alexander Hamilton is to be seen in new photographs of the restored house. Hamilton’s and other founding families are bought to life in rituals of birth and death, the food they ate, their household […]

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January 3, 2012

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House-Dreams: How One Man’s Vision Became a Family Home

The ultimate do-it-yourself project? To build a house. House-Dreams is the story of how an amateur builder and his novice apprentices turned an overgrown blackberry patch, ten truckloads of lumber, a keg of cut nails, and an antique staircase into a real home. It’s the story of a family — Hugh Howard, his wife, Betsy, […]

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